Friday, January 25, 2013


THE MOON
   by Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822)

I.

AND, like a dying lady lean and pale,
Who totters forth, wrapp'd in a gauzy veil,
Out of her chamber, led by the insane
And feeble wanderings of her fading brain,
The moon arose up in the murky east
A white and shapeless mass.


II.

Art thou pale for weariness
Of climbing heaven and gazing on the earth,
Wandering companionless
Among the stars that have a different birth,
And ever changing, like a joyless eye
That finds no object worth its constancy?





Critical Analysis of P.B. Shelley's The Moon by Ardhendu De

Monday, December 3, 2012

A Reason to Love


Sometimes it's all about perseverance...
Mayla by Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

Daily Something #21: Whispers of Winter

Whispers of Winter
            By Lora Gill

autumn
leaves in a breath
anticipating wake
stilled by the sleeping whispers' songs
rested

Sunday, November 4, 2012

Daily Something #20: Discovering Cinquain

A cinquain is a poem with five unrhymed lines that consist of a 2, 4, 6, 8, 2 syllabic pattern.  This poem was written by Adelaide Crapsey, the inventor of the cinquain.

November Night
By Adelaide Crapsey (1878-1914)

Listen...
With faint dry sound,
Like steps of passing ghosts,
The leaves, frost-crisp'd, break from the trees
And fall.

Thursday, November 1, 2012

Facing the Sun


"Bring me the sunflower crazed with the love of light."  -Eugenio Montale

I have been reading some poetry by the Italian poet, Eugenio Montale (1896-1981). He received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1975.  Here is one of my favorite translations of his sunflower poem. The above quote is translated in a different way: The Sunflower .

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